7 Ways to Fight Colorism with Technology

There are plenty of ways to fight colorism in our everyday lives, and technology is obviously one of my favorite.

Technology, when available, is a great tool for fighting colorism because it engages your creativity, promotes media literacy, and connects you to people and information around the globe.

Here are 7 ways you can use technology in your daily life to help heal colorism.

1. Research your family history.

Researching your family history is a way to deal with personal struggles related to colorism because it can give you a better sense of self. By reconnecting with your roots, you gain perspective on where you came from, where you are, and who you’ve come to be up to this point.

If relatives join together to research their history, it can foster healing, growth, and bonding for the family. If your family has a wide spectrum of skin tones, hair texture, and facial features, this could also explain and encourage discussion about those differences.

Ancestry.com is my personal recommendation for a great way to start researching and documenting your family tree. Many local libraries also have special genealogy sections that are free and open to the public. However, there’s nothing like sitting and listening to the older relatives impart their own knowledge about the family history.

But even the old fashioned oral histories can be recorded and shared through the use of modern technology, which is probably a good idea so that stories remain long after the storyteller is gone.

2. Start or sign petitions.

The online tool for petitions that I’m recommending is Change.org. This site comes with lots of features that allow you to search for or get notifications about causes and issues you care about. It also helps you create and spread the word about your own petitions.

Some of the more popular petitions addressing colorism have to do with casting, such as the Straight Outta Compton casting call and the casting of Zoe Saldana as Nina Simone.

However, there are many other worthy causes pertaining to colorism and other issues that you can throw your support behind with a simple “signature.”

3. Download or stream movies, shows, videos, or songs.

I choose Netflix for watching movies and some shows. When I first signed up, I searched specifically for movies made by and about people of color in all countries. I created a really long queue of such films and watched them one at a time.

I’ve also streamed television shows and movies on Amazon. I discovered it when one of my coworkers was showing her students the movie Roots on Amazon Instant Video.

I buy songs either from iTunes or Amazon. Unfortunately, there are many songs I haven’t been able to access due to country restrictions.

Also consider subscribing to YouTube channels that post thought provoking, inspiring, or relevant content.

Because we have a little less control over what airs on television or what’s featured in movie theaters, the internet is a good alternative source for media that is affirming and that tells the often untold stories.

Obviously, the internet is also filled with a lot of “bad” stuff, so you must put in a little extra effort to sift through some junk until you find some gems.

4. Share positive posts, especially about people of color.

Okay, this seems so easy, yet we don’t do it enough, probably because we allow so much junk and negativity to clutter our social media timelines that we don’t see nearly enough good stuff. I know I’ve been guilty in the past for focusing on the sad, troubling, or controversial posts on Facebook and Twitter. But we’re making changes, right?

Sharing (or retweeting) positive posts starts with populating our news feeds with more positive, productive, inspiring content to balance out the other stuff.

Follow people who post non-junk and be on the lookout for an inspiring story or motivational quote to share. If you’ve found great content suggested in tip #3, share that too.

Notice I say SHARE, not like, favorite, or even comment (although these things are good to do in addition to sharing). If we want to spread the positive stuff, then liking, favoriting, and commenting aren’t going to help as much as sharing or retweeting.

Also look out for actual photos and images of people that main stream media don’t publish often, or people who represent a type that was once invisible (and still drastically underrepresented) in main stream media. Share those.

5. Buy products.

You’re probably going to buy a book, or a T-shirt, or a doll, or jewelry, or a piece of artwork at some point, right? You can search online for retail products that affirm the heritage, skin tone, hair texture, or features that you have, or that your children have.

There’s now a line of nude colored bras for black women.

You can also search for these products to help you and your family become familiar with, comfortable with, and appreciative of people’s differences.

Many small, local, minority owned businesses have online retail options, so you’re also not limited by transportation or location.

6. Create collages.

Because main stream media does a poor job showing positive images of people of color, especially those with dark skin, we must be more proactive in surrounding ourselves and our children with such imagery. Creating collages is a great way to do this.

I made this collage with Photovisi. It’s super simple because it’s all done online and there are very few features to distract and confuse you.

collage photovisi ways to fight colorism with technology

I used a slightly more complex Collageit program to make this one. Collageit requires downloading software from the internet, which should be done with caution. But overall, I love the features!

ways to fight colorism with technology Collageit collage

I used stock photos and photos from Creative Commons to create these. Learn about other collage makers here.

7. Create Songs or Videos.

The first thing I recommend is that you create a YouTube channel. Simply sign up for a free YouTube account if you don’t already have one. This is easier to do if you already have a Gmail account.

YouTube will allow you to capture, create, edit, and share your video. You can keep the video private and only share it with people you choose, or you can make it public for anyone to see.

If you want fancier videos, there are plenty of video editing programs you can use to create the video and then upload the finished product to YouTube. Such programs can be pretty pricy, though, so I recommend using those only if you’re serious about your video making. You may also find free access to video editing software through school or another institution or organization.

These seven tech based ways to fight colorism are simple and fun places to start. Explore these strategies, and your sure to discover even more creative things you can do.

How do you use technology to spread positivity?

Selma Director Ava DuVernay Talks to Melissa Harris-Perry

As a fan of Selma, I was eager to see Melissa Harris-Perry’s interview with director Ava DuVernay. And now I’m a fan of DuVernay herself. Although she didn’t win a Globe, she’s definitely winning hearts!

In this interview, which aired the morning of the Golden Globes, DuVernay is effortlessly intelligent, creative, passionate, and talented. Go ahead and swell with pride at seeing this black woman’s brilliance on full display!

3 Takeaways from the Selma Movie

I just saw the much anticipated Selma movie. Aside from the great writing, acting, and directing, there are three other things I take from the film that I want to share with you.

1. Respectability Politics Don’t Work.

“Respectability Politics” is essentially the belief that black people will get respect when they deserve respect.

After the murder of Michael Brown (and countless times before) people of all races claimed that the “ghetto” and “thuggish” ways of blacks are the source of all their problems. People were actually outraged that others of us were outraged about racism and systemic inequality.

Proponents of Respectability Politics insist that if blacks stop sagging their pants, stop talking slang, stop listening to rap music, stop being lazy, stop killing each other, focus on getting good grades in school, get off the streets, get jobs, and just be productive and “respectable” citizens, then police brutality would not be a problem in their communities. Not only is this notion based on stereotypes, it’s also dangerous for the very people who subscribe to it.

Respectability politics ultimately blames victims and lets the discriminators, rapists, murderers, and bullies off the hook, giving them license to continue doing harm to others. People turn to respectability politics because white privilege and male privilege means that people of color and women are responsible for staying out of trouble while whites and men are not held responsible for causing the trouble.

People turn to respectability politics because they can’t accept the idea that bad things happen to “good” people too, that something bad could happen to them no matter how hard they try to live “good” lives, or that life is often beyond their control. They want to feel safe, so they convince themselves that victims of cruelty, violence, or injustice must have brought it upon themselves. Some even go so far as to believe that the only people who deserve to be treated humanely are the ones who look, think, believe, behave, talk, and live like them.

The Selma movie exposes the lie of Respectability Politics by showing unarmed women and men, who are well dressed in conservative suits, dresses, and work clothes, being brutally beaten, shot, and killed by police officers. The Selma movie shows well spoken, church going, educated, gainfully employed women and men being hatefully beaten, shot, and murdered by police.

The scene most condemning of respectability politics comes early in the film with the church bombing that killed four innocent young girls. What did those girls do to deserve such a tragic death?

The Selma movie shows that hatred and racism are not about what the victims do or who they are. It shows that hatred and racism is not about the targets, but about the perpetrators.

2. We can be United Despite Disagreement.

One of my favorite aspects of the movie is that it highlights the many figures who worked ahead of, along with, and after Dr. King.

These other leaders often disagreed with Dr. King and with each other.

But private arguments did not stop their public efforts.

The film even touches on the fundamental, ideological difference between Dr. King and Malcolm X. Selma subtly illustrates how Malcolm X used that difference to support the greater cause of voting rights.

Another conflict highlighted in the film is between the SCLC and SNCC. At several points in the film we see disagreement, even anger, from each organization, and at several points in the film we see the two organizations joining together despite their different approaches and opinions.

The conflicts aren’t always resolved, but Selma shows just how possible it is to be allies even when we disagree on the details.

I would hope that activists in our present moment see Selma as an example of how even when we start on different paths, sometimes those paths cross. I hope they see Selma as an example of how we can be moving toward the same destination even though our paths sometimes diverge.

3. Everyone Plays an Important Role in the Movement — On One Side or the Other.

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“We Must Take Sides. Neutrality Helps the Oppressor, Never the Victim.” —Elie Wiesel

Selma shows us that saying and doing nothing, minding our own business, keeping a low profile, not wanting to stir things up or step on anyone’s toes, makes us complicit in the hatred, violence, and oppression.

The movie shows that actively fighting for justice in the face of longstanding institutional, political, and social oppression takes enormous courage, yet the movie also forces us to consider which side of history we want to be on. What kind of legacy will we leave?

From President Lyndon B. Johnson first resisting then finally agreeing to change legislation, to the men and women of all races and creeds acting and serving in the struggle, to the officers terrorizing innocent and peaceful citizens, to the men, women, and children attacking innocent people or cheering on violent and murderous police riots, to the journalists documenting the events, to the spectators watching it all on television — everyone plays an important part in the outcome of the struggle. Everyone has to live with the role they chose to play.

Have you seen the Selma movie? What are your takeaways?

Revlon Lawsuit, Sony Hack: Why Executive Opinions Matter

sony revlonIn the Spring of 2014, Donald Sterling was rebuked for making racist comments during a private conversation that was secretly recorded by his supposed girlfriend. Later that same year, Sony made headlines after hackers leaked private emails containing racially charged statements by company leaders. Now, another company is in the news for a similar reason. A Revlon lawsuit brought against the makeup company by a former employee accuses the company’s CEO of making racist statements about blacks, Jews, and Americans. Much like the Sterling and Sony situations, people are outraged and condemning the company on social media.

The Revlon case is slightly different than Sterling’s and Sony’s, however, because there’s no hard evidence (recordings or emails) that we know of. There are only allegations, and the lawsuit is still unresolved.

Even if the allegations against Revlon turn out to be false, what all of these cases force us to ask is why do executive opinions matter?

To some people these opinions don’t matter. They’re just trivial words that someone might have said as a joke or without really thinking. Or maybe they’re just inarticulate versions of what these people were really trying to say. Others might believe that owners and CEOs have the right to their opinions just like the rest of us. Then there’s the all too familiar notion that Americans are too politically correct and that blacks are just too sensitive.

To folks on the other side of the debate, though, the answer is almost too obvious. These racist comments deserve outrage simply because racism is despicable. Period.

I obviously agree that racism is unacceptable from anyone. But I like to stress the reasons why we should be especially vigilant against racism within leadership, whether in business, religion, or politics. Some opinions matter more than others. Because company leaders are in a position to make decisions that affect millions of people, their beliefs have a greater significance to the public.

When it comes to major companies like Revlon and Sony, one of the public concerns is economic. Racism, colorism, sexism and other biases, especially at such large companies, affect employment opportunities and earning potential for thousands of people. To address economic disparities between groups, we must examine the belief systems of corporations that may influence hiring and pay. There are well documented employment and wealth gaps based on race, color, and gender that justify public concern for company biases.

Another public concern is the spread of ideas. This is usually a big part of the conversation about causes and solutions to colorism, racism, and sexism. The beauty and fashion industries, which include companies like Revlon, are notorious for their egregious lack of diversity. Many of us point a finger at these industries for upholding whiteness as the standard of beauty and all things good and desirable. Fashion and beauty industries perpetuate white supremacy on runways, billboards, magazine pages, commercials, popup ads, posters, catalogs, and everywhere else they depict images.

Sony, even more so than Revlon, plays a huge role in spreading images and ideas around the world through Hollywood movies. Many people mistakenly believe movies are just a harmless form of entertainment. However, research studies have shown that movies do influence our concepts about people, places, and things. That influence is often an unrecognizable, subconscious process that may vary for each person, but it’s real nonetheless.

In order for companies to be innovators in diversity and “change the game” on race, color, and gender in their industries, they need leadership. If the leaders of a company have racist or sexist beliefs, strains of racism and sexism will spread throughout the entire company. Therefore, the public should be upset when top executives make racist comments, and we should hold these executives accountable.

When news about the Revlon lawsuit hit the internet, people went on social media to publicly declare their refusal to support the company and to call for a collective boycott. Unfortunately, companies aren’t likely to change based on “what’s right.” Consumers must deliver a substantial blow to a company’s bottom line before it moves in their direction. Some companies may change based on the mere threat of a boycott, but consumers must be prepared to actually follow through and carry out their plan. And they will likely have to sustain their boycotts and protests for several months (years?) before they get a reasonable response.

Revlon has responded to the backlash and said that the allegations are false, that the former employee is merely disgruntled and lost his job based on poor performance, and that their CEO Lorenzo Delpani is not a bigot or racist. I hope that Revlon’s claims are true. I hope the allegations are false. I hope Delpani is not a bigot or racist. I would hope that for anyone.

But if allegations of racism and bigotry are shown to be true in Revlon’s case or any other company’s, consumers should demand a change of leadership.

Happy New Year 2015

Happy New Year!

I do not know what 2014 was like for you (though I hope it was full of joy and love). What I do know is that “every day is another chance,” and so is every new year.

For Colorism Healing, we achieved a milestone in 2014 by hosting the first ever National Colorism Poetry Contest. That was a beautiful moment in the life of this blog.

Regrettably, though, the blog fell silent in the second half of the year. As the primary content creator, I shifted my focus to school work for the first semester of my Ph.D. program. Though I was blogging less, I was still researching and writing about the things that matter for this blog–colorism, activism, digital media, women of color, and literacy.

Aside from returning to school, 2014 was memorable because of the explosion of national attention to race relations. Although colorism may seem like a relatively narrow issue to focus a blog on, I and the other contributors have always acknowledged that the deeper roots of colorism are racism and global white supremacy at large.

In 2014 I reflected deeply on the massive, worldwide protests in response to the Michael Brown case in Ferguson, the Eric Garner case in New York, and the countless other cases of police brutality across America. I reflected frequently on the #BlackLivesMatter hashtag. I even had my own personal encounters with a police officer openly expressing racial bias in a public place and other forms of racial harassment from white civilians that deeply affected me. To top it off, I also grew interested in the raging war between Azealia Banks and Iggy Azalea.

All of this caused me to really consider my role in these types of conversations and struggles. As a writer, as a blogger, and as a growing scholar, there was much that I wanted to say, needed to say. Some of it came out in my academic work, but I continued to think about this blog.

Colorism Healing is a work of love. I don’t make money from it. I’m simply passionate about the issue, passionate about healing for individuals and communities affected by it, and passionate about ending it. So I knew that the new year would have to come with a renewed commitment to this work.

I’m taking a couple of things from 2014 that will change this blog. The first is a more holistic approach to colorism, which includes increased focus on the broader environment of racism and white supremacy that fuels colorism as we know it. This has always been a part of the blog in one way or another, but in 2015 we need more.

The other thing I’m bringing into 2015 is greater attention to current events, the news of the day as it pertains to race and color. In the past, I’ve avoided newsy topics because I didn’t want this blog to turn into a gossip site, filled with negativity, ranting and raving, or cynicism. I wanted to focus on healing and solutions, uplift and empowerment. However, 2014 reinforced for me that it’s sometimes necessary to speak up about current events. I’m committed to addressing significant news topics when they arise while still keeping the focus on healing and solutions. While I want the overall tone to remain positive, really resolving colorism requires direct and honest conversation, which will make some people uncomfortable, upset, even angry. But in the end, it’s what we need to really make progress.

I’ve said all of this in hopes that you will stay with me in 2015 as we continue the work of Colorism Healing. The healing cannot happen without YOU! Whether you’re seeking healing for yourself, friends and family, or just the whole wide world, I want to do my part in continuing to offer inspiration, questions, resources, insights, ideas, and a platform for you. If you’re not getting what you want from this blog, let me know. This blog really is here for you, the community.

Thanks for being a part of it all thus far.

Here’s to another 365! One day at a time!

2 Upcoming Films about Colorism

I know many of you are searching for films about colorism, so I wanted to make you aware of two upcoming films that seem really promising.

Light Girls

Bill Duke is back at it as director of the upcoming documentary Light Girls, the sequel to Dark Girls, along with producer Stephanie Frederic. Light Girls features several well-known women who continue the conversation on colorism, including entertainers Lisaraye, Amber Rose, and Luenell as well as blogger/writer Luvvie Ajayi, along with many others.

One of the really amazing things about this phase of the project is the Selfie Campaign in which the creators of the film asked fans to submit one minute videos responding to specific questions and taking the pledge to end colorism. I think this is an amazing way to engage the community and help us see that this conversation, this issue is for all of us to take up, not just professional filmmakers. There’s even a submission from Colorism Healing you can check out here.

According to the Light Girls Facebook page, the film is set to air on the Oprah Winfrey Network in January 2015!

Skinned

Famous actress Lisaraye McCoy takes on a new role as director of the film Skinned, starring Jasmine Burke as the lead character Jolie. Skinned tackles the troubling epidemic of skin bleaching as Jolie, who has been the object of cruelty and ridicule because of her dark skin, turns to skin bleaching to free herself from the pain of colorism.

Although I haven’t seen the film, I recommend it for a couple of reasons: 1) It’s extremely rare that we get a (non-documentary) feature that directly addresses colorism and skin bleaching as the central conflict in the movie. 2) A significant part of the plot seems to be about the healing process.

We can expect Skinned to be released in the Spring of 2015, according to the website. To learn more about this film, visit www.skinnedmovie.com.

Colorism in Casting Call for ‘Straight Outta Compton’ NWA Film

The Hollywood casting agency Sande Alessi reportedly issued an “apology” through TMZ regarding their casting call for the film Straight Outta Compton (NWA biopic). Universal Pictures and the filmmakers have also since distanced themselves from the casting call.

Here’s the casting call originally posted on the agency’s Facebook page, then deleted, but not before being transcribed by Gawker:

SAG OR NON UNION CASTING NOTICE FOR FEMALES-ALL ETHNICITIES- from the late 80’s. Shoots on “Straight Outta Compton”. Shoot date TBD. We are pulling photos for the director of featured extras…

SAG OR NON UNION FEMALES – PLEASE SEE BELOW FOR SPECIFIC BREAKDOWN. DO NOT EMAIL IN FOR MORE THAN ONE CATEGORY:

A GIRLS: These are the hottest of the hottest. Models. MUST have real hair – no extensions, very classy looking, great bodies. You can be black, white, asian, hispanic, mid eastern, or mixed race too…

B GIRLS: These are fine girls, long natural hair, really nice bodies. Small waists, nice hips. You should be light-skinned. Beyonce is a prototype here…

C GIRLS: These are African American girls, medium to light skinned with a weave…

D GIRLS: These are African American girls. Poor, not in good shape. Medium to dark skin tone. Character types…

Okay, I’ll give you time to read that over again…

According to TMZ the agency says the casting call was an “innocent mistake,” and that anyone can audition as D Girls, not just dark-skinned African American girls.

As for their A-B-C-D grouping, it’s apparently what they typically use to find different types of people for any project.

In fact, the letter system is apparently common in Hollywood casting in general as a way to rank either attractiveness or importance. Yesha Callahan at The Root writes:  “For anyone not familiar with casting and the categories used, in the above post the letters A, B, C, and D are used to rank the extras. ‘A’ means the ‘better-looking’ extras, and ‘D’ stands for the undesirables…”

Now that you know  the A through D ranking system is commonly used in Hollywood to measure attractiveness or importance, you might want to scroll back up and review this particular casting call again. Go ahead. The rest of this post will be waiting when you get back.

Colorism in Casting is Common

Sadly, colorism in Hollywood is not limited to just this one particular casting call. Even actresses as famous and successful as Gabrielle Union, Viola Davis, and Alfre Woodard have spoken about the disparities in casting based on skin tone.

In a special “Oprah’s Next Chapter,” these darker skinned actresses briefly discussed being told “You can’t go for that role because that’s for the ‘cute’ black girl.”

ABC News also has a post on skin tone discrimination in Hollywood that includes the perspective of one light skinned actress:

Actress Wendy Raquel Robinson has noticed the difference. “I’ve never been offered, you know, the crackhead or the distressed mother,” she said. “I play the very upscale, educated young lady,” Robinson said. “I do have some peers that are a lot darker than myself. They don’t get the opportunities.”

If women who looked like Gabrielle Union, Lupita Nyong’o, Kelly Rowland, Tyra Banks, or Naomi Campbell auditioned for Straight Outta Compton, they’d be limited to D roles only (maybe Tyra could squeak by in a C role) no matter how gorgeous they are.

But this has bigger implications than who gets cast as “pretty” or “unattractive” characters.

Colorism reduces earning potential for dark skinned actresses

In their apology to TMZ, Sande Alessi said they weren’t just looking for dark skinned African Americans to play “poor” girls. Notice, however, that they did not correct anything about their A, B, or C casting descriptions.

Would dark skinned girls be allowed to audition for A, B, or C roles?

If not, then non-blacks and light skinned blacks could potentially audition for any of the four categories, while dark skinned black girls are limited to auditioning for only one. Because of a racist stereotype, there are four times as many job opportunities for light skinned women as there are for dark skinned women in this particular casting call.

As difficult as it is for dark skinned women to be cast as the gorgeous girl in minor or supporting roles, it’s even more difficult for them to land the more lucrative leading roles.

Denzel Washington told The Hollywood Reporter the advice he gives to his own dark skinned daughter:

I tell my daughter: “You’re black, you’re a woman, and you’re dark skinned at that. So you have to be a triple, quadruple threat…. Look at Viola Davis. That’s who you want to be. You want to be her. Forget about the little pretty girls because … if you’re relying on that, when you hit 40, you’re out the door. You better have some chops.”

The idea of earning potential being affected by skin tone discrimination is not new.

Colorism and class

Several others have noted the only mention of class is in the D category, which in this casting call is associated with being less attractive and medium to dark skinned.

In many countries, dark skin is associated with poverty, while fair skin is associated with wealth. These associations are unfortunately based on a bleak reality (Brazil example).

Even research in the U.S. provides evidence of a color-based wealth/income gap that sort of runs parallel to the race-based gap. (I’m currently delving into the historical research of Howard N. Bodenhorn. You can explore more research on colorism here.)

However, this does not mean that all poor or wealthy people have the same physical features. Poor and wealthy people come in all colors, sizes, and shapes.

The repeated Hollywood depictions of dark skinned people as poor and uneducated or light skinned people as wealthy and successful, actually helps perpetuate socio-economic disparities in the real world.

Hair

The writer of this casting call was very clear that the “hottest of the hottest” girls have long hair that’s not weave.

First of all, women of all ethnicities wear fake hair pieces in Hollywood, even the ones whose hair is already long. It’s called being an actress, or model, or performer. One gig might require a short bob, the next might require a big afro, the next might require a bald head, and the next might require Rastafarian style locs. In order to make this happen, stylists use fake hair all the time. It’s HOLLYWOOD. Nothing is as it seems.

Second, not only have they excluded dark skinned women from A or B roles, they’ve also excluded light skinned women reminiscent of Halle Berry or Alicia Keys, and even white women reminiscent of Jennifer Lawrence, just because their hair is short.

Third, the ranking suggests that the most attractive girls in the film will all have naturally long (straight/wavy) hair. This is Hollywood again perpetuating a dangerously narrow or unrealistic standard of beauty. The truth is, my friends, beautiful women come with all different types of hair textures and lengths, including bald. But, as this casting call exemplifies, we’ll never see the diversity of that beautiful hair because it’s restricted before casting directors ever actually see any women. They don’t even allow for the possibility that the “hottest” woman to audition might have short hair. It would appear they can’t even fathom such a thing.

Finally, the casting call plays on the stereotype that African American women in general, and in particular medium and dark skinned women are not able to have long hair without weaves. This is a myth. The problem, as Dr. Neely stated in her post on hair shaming, is that black women’s hair is damaged in the cycle of trying to achieve styles that are naturally suited to white women’s hair, thus preventing many black women’s hair from growing to it maximum potential. Again, this casting call is a perfect example of why so many black women try to achieve that look, because it’s what society ranks and has always ranked as most attractive and acceptable.

“That’s just how it is.”

by B Garrett via flickr

When I consider how many projects Sande Alessi has worked on, it’s no wonder there’s so little representation of dark skinned black women in Hollywood. In most of their films, they probably didn’t even bother casting African American women, and thus have never been exposed for their racism and colorism. But Straight Outta Compton clearly presented a challenge for them. Since they had to include lots of black women, I guess they figured they should do their best to limit them to the “least desirable” roles.

It’s perfectly fine for casting directors and filmmakers to want specific characters. There’s nothing wrong with specific. Specific is art.

But the so called “specific” descriptions in Sande Alessi’s casting call are nothing more than racist, regressive, lazy, shallow, stereotypes. That’s bad storytelling. That’s bad film-making.

And while that’s always and too often the reality in Hollywood, we have a right to be unsatisfied with it. We have the right to speak out, to petition, to boycott, to never stop fighting for change. Because what happens in Hollywood, unfortunately doesn’t stay in Hollywood. It get’s projected around the globe and has real-world consequences.

I am happy to see that as of Friday, Universal Pictures and the Straight Outta Compton Filmmakers have released a statement distancing themselves from the casting call:

“the filmmakers … did not approve and do not condone the information in this casting notice. We regret and sincerely apologize for being in any way associated with the offensive descriptions it contained.”