(Another) Colorism Healing Sister Interview

In this latest video from the Colorism Healing YouTube channel, I paid a visit to the University of Mississippi’s Tupelo campus to interview my older sister, Dr. Jandel Crutchfield, about colorism as it relates to family, motherhood and parenting, social work, and education. “…really using your light skin privilege, your voice, to be able to do what research can’t necessarily do. But what you can do in a family may touch a lot more people than research can.” —Dr. Jandel Crutchfield What are your sibling experiences with colorism?? Share in the comments below.

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7 Minute Sundays Colorism Healing Reading and Dialogue

I started the month of March with a great opportunity to speak about Colorism Healing and read selections from the new book Colorism Poems at a monthly local event called “7 Minute Sundays,” hosted by my friend and fellow writer/creator Jacquelyn Brown here in Baton Rouge. Here’s video from the beginning of this event. We did not record the dialogue in order to respect the privacy of some individuals. However, I must say that everyone present expressed sincere appreciation for the discussion. I was thoroughly encouraged by all of their participation, honesty, questioning, and wisdom. If you’d like me to speak at your event, contact me here.

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Black Men and Colorism: 12 Must-Read Blog Posts

As we seek to address colorism in our societies, we will need the voices and support of all members of our community. For that reason, I’ve wanted to incorporate more of a male perspective on colorism on this site. Black men have already written several blog posts on colorism, and I recommend reading the ones listed here. These posts provide helpful insight into how some black men view and experience colorism. The authors represent a range of personal and professional backgrounds, and each post demonstrates that there are multiple narratives around the issue of colorism. 1. “Color Struck: The Politics of Shade in the Black Community” by Marc Polite (5/30/2011) Marc published this… Read More

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An Open Letter to Gabby Douglas

Dear Gabby, When I was a young girl, I wanted to be just like you! Yes, I’m about a decade older than you, but seeing you win gold and make history at the London Olympics in 2012 brought me back to my childhood days of obsession with the Magnificent 7 (Dominque Dawes in particular). You possessed talents I could only pretend to have (embarrassingly enough, as my older sister will attest). The fact that at such a young age you overcame racism, loneliness, and separation from your family on top of the intense training required of gold medalists made you one of my all-time personal heroes. I anticipated your 2016… Read More

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Photos from the Blogging While Brown preview tour of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

Colorism at the Smithsonian

While in Washington DC for the Blogging While Brown Conference in July, we got a preview tour of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (opens Sept. 24). I was pleasantly surprised to see Colorism featured in one of the exhibits! Along with basic information about the African American struggle against anti-black racism, the exhibit highlighted classic works of literature, film, and art that address colorism, including Dark Girls and The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison. When I consider that Oprah Winfrey had a significant hand in making this museum a reality, it makes perfect sense. She’s been a big supporter of tackling the issue of colorism.… Read More

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Why We Need the Loving Movie in 2016

A few days ago, as part of the Blogging While Brown conference in DC, I got to participate in a preview and discussion about the upcoming Loving movie. Ruth Negga, who stars in the leading role as Mildred Loving, also Skyped in from London to do a live interview with us. There’s still a surprising number of people who have never heard the history of Mildred and Richard Loving, despite its significance in the Civil Rights legacy. Mildred, a black woman, and Richard, a white man, were arrested in Virginia in 1958 for being in an interracial marriage. They sued and took their case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court and won, helping to strike down anti-miscegenation… Read More

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2016 Colorism Healing Poetry Contest Results

We are excited to announce the top 5 winners in each Division of the 2016 CHPC. Thank you to our judges and to everyone who submitted poetry or supported this work in any way. Below are the results of the 2016 Colorism Healing Poetry Contest. Click the title to read the poem. Division 2: Ages 12-19 1st Place: “Ghost” by Ren-Caspar Smith 2nd Place: “On Being a Dark Skin” by Basirat A. Owe 3rd Place: “La Morena” by Esmeralda Hic 4th Place: “Contrast” by Marielle R. Medina 5th Place: “Mi Negrita” by Arianne Amparo Division 3: Ages 20+ 1st Place: “The Baby Factory” by Cassandra Alfred 2nd Place: “Getting Blacker”… Read More

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Judging Underway for 2016 CHPC

We’re deep in the midst of judging! The submission period for the 2016 Colorism Healing Poetry Contest officially closed on April 30th. Thank you to all who participated or supported the contest in any way. Now our team of judges will review all entries to decide which ones will receive top prizes. We anticipate announcing the winners at the end of May or early June. In the meantime, keep reading to learn more about our honored judges, our generous sponsors, and interesting facts about this year’s contest. Judge Dr. JeffriAnne Wilder Dr. JeffriAnne Wilder is currently an Associate Professor of Sociology & Founding Director of the Institute for the Study… Read More

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Stop Letting Whites Off the Hook for Colorism

I’d like to dispell the myth that white people are total outsiders when it comes to colorism. The notion that white people are completely clueless, innocent, and irrelevant when it comes to colorism is false. Some people claim that to white people “we’re all just black.” They believe that whites see no difference among blacks and do not treat blacks differently based on skin tone. That’s mostly untrue. To the Ku Klux Klan, yes, black people are just black regardless of skin tone, hair texture, facial features, etc. BUT, most white people are not members of the KKK. It’s true that many white people may not be familiar with the term “colorism” or… Read More

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2016 Colorism Healing Poetry Contest Now Open!

The Colorism Healing Poetry Contest is BACK! The purpose of the Colorism Healing Poetry Contest is to raise awareness about colorism among all peoples and to provide a productive, creative outlet for self-expression and healing. Click here for a definition of colorism. Deadline: April 30, 2016 Eligibility This year the poetry contest is open to all ages separated into three divisions: •Division 1- Ages 11 and under •Division 2- Ages 12-19 •Division 3- Ages 20+ Awards •1st Place- $50, Publication online and in print •2nd Place- $25, Publication online and in print •Honorable Mentions (as chosen by judges)- Publication online and in print •Editor’s Picks (as chosen by the editor)-… Read More

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List of Movies & Films about Colorism

Many of Colorism Healing’s readers are movie fans, and several have even been looking for movies and films about colorism in particular. While the documentary Dark Girls and its sequel Light Girls are widely known among those interested in colorism, there are other notable movies and films that address this issue. However, after searching around online, I realized it wasn’t exactly the easiest task to locate all of them. There weren’t any sites with a basic list of colorism films that readers could browse. So I created this for you. Movies, Films, Documentaries about Colorism A Question of Color (1993) Said to be the first documentary to address colorism, this film… Read More

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Author Interview: Piper Huguley and Historical Romance

When I published the Ultimate List of Colorism Books back in September, I discovered several new titles and new authors I didn’t know were out there. One of them was A Most Precious Pearl by Piper Huguley. As a historical romance novelist who features African American characters, Huguley is a best-selling author and has won notable awards for several of her books. Before the book was officially recommended for the Ultimate List, I’d actually seen someone recommending it to a friend on Twitter as a novel that actually deals with colorism in romance. @FountainPenDiva think we should check out Most Precious Pearl by @piperhuguley deals w/what we’ve always talked about!… Read More

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